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Policy Update May 2015

Every Child Achieves Act

In April 2015, the Senate HELP Committee began marking up a bipartisan bill, The Every Child Achieves Act. When the bill was initially presented, it included PE as a core subject, but eliminated the PEP program, which is the only source of dedicated federal funding for PE.

Sen. Baldwin offered an amendment in Committee to restore the PEP program, which was accepted without objection. The bill passed the Committee with a 22-0 vote; however, full Senate consideration is uncertain at this point. With PEP back in and PE as a core subject, NCPPA supports the Every Child Achieves Act. NCPPA circulated a sign-on letter in support of the bill.

FIT Kids Act

On April 23, 2015, Representatives Ron Kind (D-WI) and Patrick Meehan (R-PA), and Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) reintroduced the Fitness Integrated with Teaching (FIT) Kids Act in Congress, H.R. 2013 and S. 1075. This legislation promotes physical activity by strengthening grants to schools across the country to initiate, expand or enhance physical education programs for students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. The bill restores the 37 percent cut the Carol M. White Physical Education Program (PEP) sustained in the FY2015 appropriations, and would also require states applying for these PEP grants to adopt physical activity standards and use the funds for physical education programs that are evidence-based.

EEOC Statement on Worksite Wellness

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) recently published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking describing how Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to employer wellness programs that are part of group health plans. In addition, the EEOC has also published a fact sheet for Small Businesses and a Q&A document for the general public.

**Members of the public have until Friday, June 19 to submit comments.

Workplace Wellness and Optimizing Workplace Health

The American Heart Association released new recommendations to address gaps in common standards around comprehensive workplace wellness programs (CWWPs). The recommendations improve the design, measurement, and recognition of CWWPs. If adopted by employers, improved CWWPs could significantly impact efforts to improve the cardiovascular health of the American workforce.  Read the full article in Circulation.